Posts Tagged ‘element of surprise’

2-3 Goal Difference Per Game: Quick Kicks

August 25, 2009

The quick-kick is seldom used. Yet executed at the right time, you are almost guaranteed a goal. However, use them sparingly and only in offensive third when you know you can catch the defensive team napping.

The free kick law states that the only time a free kick needs to start on a whistle is for ceremonial kicks which is when an offensive player asks the referee for the defensive team to be moved back 10 yards from the kick. The ball must also be stationary when the kick is taken. If there any movement on the ball, the referee will ask for a re-take and any advantage now and in the future will be lost. Follow this tips when accessing the possibility of taking a quick kick.

  • As soon as you know the foul has been called for you, access the situation. If an advantage can be gained by playing the ball quickly, do so. Make sure a player is not hurt and the ball is not moving.
  • If the player who is fouled falls on the ball with her hands, the referee be forced to call a foul. If the foul is for the attacking team, a player will already have the ball in their possession and a quick start can occur quicker. However, make sure to bring the ball back to the spot of the infraction before the kick so the referee will not have you re-take the kick because of an unfair advantage having been gained (a free kick needs to be kick very close to where the infraction occurred). However, if a player falls on the ball with her hands and the foul goes against that player, the referee may be onto her and at a minimum, present a yellow card to that player.
  • Don’t telegraph the quick kick. Be very calm, quiet, and appear to be indifferent.

Defensive Strategy

It is always better to be safe than sorry. Always assume the other team may take a quick kick. Therefore,

  • As soon as the foul is committed, have the nearest defending player stand in front of the ball–not over the ball but close to it. Don’t make it too obvious. A referee could issue a yellow card immediately for delay of game or if in the opinion of the referee, the player does not retreat immediately when asked. Normally a 1-2 to second delay is all it takes to discouraged a team from trying the quick kick.
  • If the foul occurs in the offensive third, make sure the goalie and defenders alert everyone to the possibility of a quick kick. By alerting everyone, the opposing team is less likely to try it.
  • Don’t get caught napping
  • Never have your goalie set up the wall until she knows that the referee has signaled for a ceremonial re-start (this is indicated by the referee pointing to his whistle). To avoid that problem entirely, keep the goalie in the center of the goal and have the center forward set-up the wall. The goalie has enough to worry about and the center forward can do the job just as easily. Plus the players in the wall are facing the forward and won’t have to turn their head to look at the goalie.

2-3 Goal Difference Per Game: Throw-Ins

August 19, 2009

There is always one kid on the team that for whatever reason is able to achieve much greater distance on her throws than the rest of the players. Coaches should use this skill to their advantage.

  • Anytime there is a throw-in within the distance of the penalty box, have that player heave the ball toward goal. The objective is to create the same type of chaos that a corner kicks do.
  • If the team only has one player with exceptional throw-in ability, hopefully that player can play in the center of the field so she can quickly and easily take throw-in from both touch lines without get exhausted. If this is not the case and you are down by one, make sure that player is on the field and they are aware that they will need need to run across the field to take the throw-ins.
  • Incorporate the element of surprise. If you have this secret throw-in weapon, don’t unveil it immediately. Wait for an opportune time when you can possibly catch the other team unprepared.
  • A player can’t be offside on a throw-in. If the other team does not know this, you are in luck.
  • Add some variety. So many teams simply throw the ball in down the wing. There is no rule that states that this must be the case. Throw the ball into the middle or even backwards. It will make the throw down the wing much more effective when you do use it.

The rules state that a throw-in must be held with both hands and delivered from behind the head. Nowhere does it state that spinning the ball is illegal. The spinning of the ball occurs when one hands is much more dominant than the other. However, if a referee feels like a players is gaining an unfair advantage by spinning the ball, a foul throw-in may be called and the ball awarded to the other team. Teach your players to throw in with little or no spin.

Defensive Strategy

At the youth level, unless the other team has an extraordinary player, throw-ins should not pose a big threat if you do the following:

  • Since there is no offside on a throw-in, never let an offensive player get behind a defender.
  • Treat a long throw-in inside your own penalty area as you would a corner kick. Stack the penalty area with more players who are not afraid to head the ball.